Lowewood Museum: Retail refurb & new coffee pop-up!

Located in a beautiful Georgian building in the town of Hoddesdon, Lowewood Museum showcases the history of the Borough of Broxbourne and is managed by the Museums, Heritage and Culture team at Epping Forest District Council. The museum recently opened a newly refurbished shop and coffee pop-up.

The old museum shop area had been a multi-function space that was dated, confused and too crowded. Catering had never been offered at the museum. Although it had been considered in the past, the risk of placing an unknown commercial proposition over gallery space was too great a leap. Over time, the provision of a café offer was identified as a priority. It would increase visitor numbers and dwell times, coupled with the creation of a revised hire space to give the museum a new commercial footing.

Last year Epping Forest District, Broxbourne Borough and Chelmsford City museums were successful in setting up a ‘No Borders Partnership‘ that received Arts Council resilience funding to develop a more sustainable footing –  a keystone of which was improved commerciality.  The Museum’s aspiration to refurbish the Lowewood commercial offer was now achievable and planning for a range of activites began.

Following the appointment of a new Commercial Manager, Shane Bartley, the first identified priority was the Lowewood refurbishment project.  It soon became clear that delivery of an improved commercial offer with added venue hire opportunities meant a new divisible multi-use space. This would feature a café-style seating area to complement the new coffee pop up . The new retail offering was also developed in conjunction with the Museum’s Commercial Activities Officer, Francesca Pellegrino, who worked closely with the Council’s Youth Panel to identify new ways to refresh the shop area completely.

The project was delivered within the tight budget constraints of the resilience project grant. There were surprises along the way including the discovery of a floor that was not a floor, and the unearthing of a time capsule (that was returned for future explorers). Surprises aside, the deadline for delivery was achieved and the official opening received support from Councillors and Senior Officers from both local authorities in attendance, as well as representatives from the newly formed Culture Without Borders Development Trust, and the Museum’s Society of Friends.

Initial feedback has been very positive. One review in the Hoddesdon Society Newsletter stated “A new facility at Lowewood, quite apart from the wealth of documents, artefacts and pictures available for inspection, is an attractive snack room welcoming visitors to enjoy tea and coffee”.

For more information contact:  Shane Bartley – Sbartley@eppingforestdc.gov.uk

The Gilwell Oak : Scouting rediscovers its roots

Today’s blog has been written by Caroline Pantling, Heritage Service Manager with the Scout Association. Their Heritage Team have recently won the Woodland Trust’s 2017 Tree of the Year competition. 

The Scout Association Heritage Team have used this quirky competition, run by The Woodland Trust, to raise the profile of Gilwell’s historic landscape and Scouting’s fascinating heritage. Having won the public vote to become England’s Tree of the Year the Oak then faced competition from the other home nations and were appointed UK Tree of the Year by a panel of experts and became the UK’s representative for the European Tree of the Year.


The Gilwell Oak has become renowned throughout the world. Scouting’s founder, Robert Baden-Powell used the oak tree as an analogy for the growth of Scouting. He referred to the experimental camp run for 20 boys on Brownsea Island in 1907 as the acorn from which the oak tree of Scouting grew. Today the Gilwell Oak sits at the heart of a Scout Adventure centre which welcomes over 40,000 young people every year.


The Gilwell Oak is located on edge of Gilwell’s Training Ground. The training offered at Gilwell Park was the first of its kind, Scout leaders from around the world attended training at Gilwell. On their return home many set up their own training centres to pass on their learning. In this way the legend of Gilwell spread and the idyllic scene of Scouts taking shelter from the summer sun (or rain) under the branches of the Training Ground’s most iconic tree became well known.


For many Scouts around the world a trip to Gilwell Park is a long held dream, hundreds visit Gilwell each year to pay homage to those who have gone before and to, maybe, collect a leaf and an acorn from its longest standing resident.

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